The Social Affairs Unit

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Welcome to the Social Affairs Unit web site

The Social Affairs Unit addresses social, economic and cultural issues with an emphasis on the value of personal responsibility. We research, challenge and debate issues from welfare to warfare, always seeking to draw out the role of the individual's obligations.

We identify research with a potential to inform public policy and translate it from academic discourse into public debate. The ideas we promote come largely from historians, sociologists and philosophers but also medical doctors and hard scientists.

Analysis, commentary and reviews by the Social Affairs Unit's authors are found on our constantly updated web review or, sorted by topic, at SAU Articles. This website also enables visitors to purchase our books and reports. A selection of these, along with our digital-only reports, are available to read online.

The Social Affairs Unit is the publisher of Standpoint, the monthly cultural and political news-stand magazine launched in June 2008.

Recent SAU articles

Margaret Thatcher: Wrong on many things, but right on the one thing that mattered - or so argues Christie Davies Christie Davies

The British Empire will outlast the European Union - argues Lincoln Allison Lincoln Allison

When the (Fairy) Dust has Settled: Lincoln Allison assesses what the long-term impact of the London Olympics will be Lincoln Allison

How to Handle a Witch (or Several): The Daylight Gate - Jeanette Winterson Lincoln Allison

Tom Holland's In the Shadow of the Sword is a great story, bravely told, but it leaves Richard D. North longing for old fashioned academic pedantry: In The Shadow Of The Sword - Tom Holland Richard D. North

Those who support European integration should support British separation from Europe - argues Brendan Simms Brendan Simms

Sunday Courts: A Kenneth Clarke proposal that Chris Grayling would do well to shelve Jan Davies

Lincoln Allison asks, are the Olympic Games the biggest con on the planet? Lincoln Allison

So how did London become so good? Lincoln Allison argues that much of what went right was due to accidental fortune Lincoln Allison

Caro gives us Lyndon Johnson in a form which would have a Shakespeare richly intrigued. This is work worthy of Cicero or a Robert Harris novel, says Richard D. North: The Passage of Power: The Years of Lyndon Johnson, volume 4 - Robert A. Caro Richard D. North

Recent publications

Private Views: Voices from the Frontline of British Culture
The Nation that Forgot God
In Search of the Moderate Muslim
War Since 1990
Don't Tread on Me: Anti-Americanism Abroad
What If? Counterfactualism and the Problem of History

Recent digital publications

Warning: Immigration Can Seriously Damage Your Wealth
Wealth And Poverty: A Jewish Analysis
How to Maximise Your Expenses: Advice to new Members of the European Parliament
Butler's Dilemma: Lord Butler's Inquiry and the Re-Assessment of Intelligence on Iraq's Weapons of Mass Destruction
British Anti-Americanism
Mr Blair's Messiah Politics: A story of inspired government, 1997-2007